Amazon Announces Fall 2016 Premiere Dates for Prime Shows

Amazon announced their Amazon Prime fall 2016 premiere dates on stage at the Television Critics Association this past Sunday, laying out their schedule through the end of 2016. The lineup includes returning favorites Transparent and The Man in the High Castle, as well as new shows from Woody Allen, David E. Kelley, and Tig Notaro.

One Mississippi — September 9, 2016

Amazon Prime’s fall season will kick off with the half-hour “traumedy” One Mississippi, starring and inspired by comedian Tig Notaro. Executive produced by Louis CK, One Mississippi follows Notaro returning to her Mississippi home to deal with the death of her mother. The pilot is available on Amazon.

Fleabag — September 16, 2016

A British import, Fleabag was created by and stars Award-winning playwright Phoebe Waller-Bridge. Fleabag is the story of a “dry-witted, sexual, angry, grief-riddled woman” trying to make her way in contemporary London after the loss of her best friend. It’s based on Waller-Bridge’s original 2013 stage play, which won the Fringe First Award at Edinburgh.

Transparent, Season 3 — September 23, 2016

Amazon’s flagship series Transparent returns for a third season on September 23, 2016. That’s a move up from the winter slot it occupied during its first two seasons. Moreover, Transparent’s premiere date is perfectly timed for maximum buzz. The 2016 Emmy Awards air less than a week before Transparent returns. Expect the show to carry several new Emmys into season 3. Prime subscribers can watch the first two seasons of Transparent on Amazon.

Crisis in Six Scenes — September 30, 2016

Amazon Prime adds another major talent with this half-hour Woody Allen comedy. Set in the 1960s, it follows a middle-class suburban family who is “visited by a guest who turns their household completely upside down.” Woody Allen writes, directs, and stars alongside Miley Cyrus, Michael Rappaport, and more.

Goliath — October 14, 2016

Starring Billy Bob Thornton, William Hurt, Olivia Thirlby, and Maria Bello, Goliath is is a new legal drama created by David E. Kelley (Ally McBeal, Boston Legal). Thornton stars as a struggling lawyer battling the powerful and in search of redemption.

Good Girls Revolt — October 28, 2016

Good Girls Revolt follows is a Mad Men-style period drama about a group of female researchers fighting for equal treatment in a bustling newsroom in 1969. Furthermore, it’s based on a true story — the landmark sexual discrimination cases against Newsweek inspired both this series and Lynn Povich’s book of the same name. You can watch the pilot on Amazon.

Red Oaks, Season 2 — November 11, 2016

Amazon’s period comedy Red Oaks follows a young tennis instructor working at the posh Red Oaks Country Club in 1986 New Jersey. The show currently boasts a 79% Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and features a cast that includes Jennifer Grey and Paul Reiser. The first season is available on Amazon.

Mozart in the Jungle, Season 3 — December 9, 2017

Amazon’s half-hour comedy/drama is based on Blair Tindall’s acclaimed memoir Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs & Classical Music. The series takes viewers into the tumultuous world of a modern New York symphony. The first two seasons are available on Amazon.

The Man in the High Castle, Season 2 — December 16, 2016

Amazon found a surprise hit with this epic series based on Phillip K. Dick’s novel. Set in an alternate history where the Axis Powers won World War II, High Castle is set in an occupied America divided between Germany and Japan. Political tensions continue to rise in season 2, and the mystery of the “Man in the High Castle” grows deeper. Amazon Prime subscribers can binge season 1 right here.

David Wharton

David Wharton

David Wharton has been a freelance writer and editor for over 12 years, contributing to publications such a The Daily Dot, CinemaBlend, GiantFreakinRobot, Cinescape, and Creative Screenwriting. He lives in Texas with three children, four dogs, and his wife. Email him at davidwharton@streamingobserver.com.
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David Wharton