Amazon is Selling NFL Advertising Time For 6x Network Prices

Amazon and several other tech giants like Twitter have been actively pursuing the rights for more and more sports streams, breaking new ground in both the sports and streaming worlds. Amazon recently signed a landmark deal with the NFL for the rights to stream NFL games on Thursday Nights, reportedly spending over $50 million for the streaming rights. Amazon will stream a total of ten Thursday night NFL games this year, meaning each game cost the retail behemoth around $5 million. How does Amazon plan on recouping such a large investment? By reportedly selling advertising slots for an astronomical price – up to six times more than network ad time costs, if reports are correct.

Amazon is reportedly selling 30-second ad slots for a whopping $2.8 million a piece. While some companies might immediately balk at such a high price, the perks of advertising on Amazon might be worth it. According to a Reuters report, the 30-second slots will be accompanied by ads run on Amazon’s website throughout the NFL season. There could be back-end perks consumers aren’t even aware of; Amazon has its fingers in nearly every soup in the tech world today and nearly everything internet users interact with on the web is related to Amazon’s products and services in one way or another. Simply put, Amazon’s advertising packages can offer a lot more than a traditional TV commercial slot. Whether or not advertisers go for the offer has yet to be seen.

An Amazon Prime membership costs $99 a year or $8.99 a month and comes with a host of perks including free two-day shipping, but most notably includes access to Amazon’s streaming video service and now Thursday night NFL games.

Brett Tingley

Brett Tingley

Brett lives at the foot of the ancient Appalachian mountains in Asheville, North Carolina and writes about technology, science, and culture.
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Brett Tingley