Netflix Has a Hidden Limit on Content Downloads

One of the less-used features of Netflix is its download feature which allows users to watch movies or shows even when not connected to the internet. Netflix launched the feature in 2016 in order to allow users to take their binge watching habit with them wherever they go – as well as to not be outdone by Amazon Prime, who offered the feature first. While the download feature has been met with mostly positive reviews, Netflix appears to have added a limit on how much users can download content, a move that has drawn some criticism on the web.

AndroidPolice first reported the discovery of Netflix’s download limit, noting that the worst part is that Netflix currently doesn’t have a warning feature letting users know they are soon approaching the limit. Furthermore, renewing a download appears to register as an entirely new download, pushing users closer to their monthly limit.

Users still aren’t sure which content is restricted by the limit or how many times content can be downloaded. Details are still scarce about the download limit, and Netflix does not appear to have issued any documentation about this rather ‘hidden’ feature. While Netflix customer satisfaction generally ranks high, several recent original series cancellations, library shake-ups and user interface changes have been met with criticism.

Netflix’s download feature is available with all plans on both iOS and Android phones and tablets. A large portion of Netflix’s library is available for download, but some series and films are restricted. Downloaded content is only available for a short time after download, sometimes just 48 hours, before it must be “renewed” by downloading it again.

Brett Tingley

Brett Tingley

Brett lives at the foot of the ancient Appalachian mountains in Asheville, North Carolina and writes about technology, science, and culture.
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Brett Tingley