Netflix Renews ‘Ozark’ for Season 2

In a year fraught with cancellations, Netflix has (rather wisely) chosen to renew breakout hit Ozark for a second season. Netflix made the announcement with a rather terse press release, stating only that the series will return for a ten-episode second season. Ozark has been somewhat of a surprise success for Netflix, appearing in a crowded year of releases and new series but wowing critics thanks to the incredible performances of its stars and the fresh take on the ever popular good-guy-goes-bad crime drama.

Ozark stars executive producer Jason Bateman as Marty Byrde, a successful financial planner who has to flee his home in the Chicago suburbs after a money laundering scheme goes awry. Byrde moves his family to a resort community in the Missouri Ozarks, attempting to keep a semblance of normal family life while attempting to pay back the money he owes Mexican drug lords. Laura Linney co-stars alongside Bateman as Marty’s wife Wendy Byrde.

Despite allowing Bateman to break out of his normal comedic roles and flex his dramatic bad-guy acting muscles, reviews of Ozark have so far been mixed. The series currently boasts a Metacritic score of 67 (with an 8.4 user score) and a 65% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes, not exactly sought-after scores. The Atlantic’s Sophie Gilbert writes that Ozark’s “dull gray and blue filters that wash everything out, and the oppressive, low-frequency soundtrack meant to amp up the tension” fail to create the narrative tension necessary to draw viewers into the Byrde family’s somewhat disjointed struggles, and it “all starts to feel like a lot of work for a very uncertain payoff.” Still, some reviewers have praised the series’ dark tone and Bateman’s performance, writing that Ozark falls “somewhere between Bloodline and Breaking Bad.”

Season two of Netflix’s Ozark does not yet have a release date.

Brett Tingley

Brett Tingley

Brett lives at the foot of the ancient Appalachian mountains in Asheville, North Carolina and writes about technology, science, and culture.
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Brett Tingley