YouTube TV VerizonYouTube TV may not be one of the leaders in the streaming television world yet, but all of that may soon change. YouTube TV has been adding more top-tier channels and expanding its availability into new markets over the last year, making it a more attractive option for many cord-cutting households. Now, YouTube TV has taken a major step towards securing a larger piece of the streaming pie by partnering with the largest wireless telecommunications provider in the United States. Starting today, Verizon and Google will team up to bring YouTube TV to Verizon customers nationwide.

According to a Verizon press release issued today, the telecom giant and Google are making it easier for customers to access YouTube TV by allowing Verizon wireless 5G home customers the ability to stream YouTube TV directly through their Verizon 5G accounts without a separate YouTube TV login. It’s still not clear what the cost of such a bundle will be, when it will launch, or if the YouTube TV package will cost more than regular 5G Verizon service.

Still, partnering directly with a wireless telecom provider is a huge step for any streaming television service. “YouTube TV has become known for its best-in-class user experience that enhances the way users watch live TV today,” said Heather Rivera, Global Head of Product Partnerships at YouTube. “With this partnership, we’re making it simple and seamless for Verizon’s customers to sign up to enjoy YouTube TV on-the-go on their mobile phones or tablets or at home on their big screen devices.”

YouTube TV overs over 70 channels and features like a cloud DVR, three simultaneous streams, and mobile compatibility – all for just $49.99. Some of the most popular networks include ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC, cable channels like Discovery, HGTV, Food Network, TNT, TBS, CNN, ESPN, and FX, as well as YouTube’s massive selection of on-demand video.

Brett Tingley

Author Brett Tingley

Brett lives at the foot of the ancient Appalachian mountains in Asheville, North Carolina and writes about technology, science, and culture. Disclosure: Streaming Observer is supported by readers. Articles may contain referral links. For more information, see the disclosure at the bottom of the page.

More posts by Brett Tingley

Leave a Reply